Frank Collinson's early partnership with John Walton -1868-70


Frank Collinson's early partnership with John Walton -1868-70

 

 

Before the partnership of Collinson and Lock was established in 1870 , Francis Collinson went into partnership with John Walton in 1868, They traded as successors to Herring, Son and Clarkes, as Collinson and Walton, as cabinet makers from 1868-1870 at 109 Fleet Street.

The announcement of their take-over of Herring was made in the  Morning Post 5th March 1868

 

HERRING, SON, and CLARK, 109, Fleet-street,

DECORATORS, CABINETMAKERS, and UPHOLSTERERS.

COLLINSON and WALTON have PURCHASED this Old-established BUSINESS, and are weeding the Stock, a great portion of which is being sold considerably under cost.”[1]

 

Their products were advertised in various ways. Soon after the first announcement,

The Pall Mall Gazette (24 June 1868) ran an advertisement for the new business.

 

MEDIEVAL FURNITURE PURE STYLE.- COLLINSON and WALTON,

successors to Herring, Son, and Clark, Decorators, Cabinet Makers, Upholsterers, Funeral Furnishers, beg to call the attention of Gentlemen about to furnish in this prevailing style to the following, which they are prepared to offer on advantageous

terms :-

A HANDSOME OAK MEDIEVAL SIDE-BOARD, Designed by Bevan.

A HANDSOME WALNUT MEDIEVAL DAVENPORT. Designed by Bevan.

THREE SUITES OF MEDIEVAL BED-ROOM FURNITURE in Wainscot, Walnut, and Birch.

MEDIEVAL CHINTZES, Of Special Designs, taken from MSS. in the British Museum, suitable for curtains and hangings on walls.

COLLINSON and WALTON, 109, FLEET-STREET.[2]

 

A year later Vanity Fair (9th Jan 1869) has this advertisement:

 

MEDIEVAL FURNITURE

PURE STYLE. BOTH SIMPLE AND RICH IN  DESIGN.

Furniture also of a simple k kind in RUSTIC GOTHIC suitable for Small Houses, Shooting and Fishing Boxes combining good taste and sound workmanship with Economy.

COLLINSON AND WALTON (Successors to Herring, Son, and Clarke)

Cabinet Makers, Upholsterers Designer Decorators and Funeral Furnishers, 100, Fleet Street.[3]

 

An example of the products of the partnership of Collinson and Walton is the Lancaster music cabinet  (images courtesy of Tony Geering Puritan Values)

 

The design was registered by George Claridge of 3, Lancaster-place, on the 1st April, 1869.  (ВТ 43/58/228961)

 

The cabinet was advertised soon afterward in the musical journal Orchestra and the Choir.

 

“The ‘LANCASTER’  has been designed to supersede the old ‘CANTERBURY’ for Music, and it forms a handsome piece of furniture for the drawing-room. Music in Sheets can be classified under several heads ; can be easily referred to; and the whole kept tidy and free from dust. The lower compartment is intended for Bound Music. To be seen at the makers, Messrs. Collinson and Walton (late Herring, Son, and Clark), 109, Fleet-street, E C. “[4]

 

A similar advertisement appeared in the fairly short-lived satirical society newspaper The Owl, A Wednesday Journal Of Politics And Society:

 

“THE LANCASTER  MUSIC CABINET (REGISTERED) forms an elegant piece of furniture for a drawing coons, Music in sheets can be classified and kept free from dust.” COLLINSON and WALTON, 109, Fleet Street, Close to Ludgate Hill Station.[5]

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Morning Post 5th March 1868

[2] Pall Mall Gazette 24 June 1868

[3] Vanity Fair 9th Jan 1869

[4] Orchestra and the Choir 9th April 1869-: Vol 12 no.  289 p.2

[5] The Owl, A Wednesday Journal Of Politics And Society. July 28th 1869 p. 8.